Canadian voters will head to the polls on Oct. 21 after what is expected to be a heated federal election campaign.  

Justin Trudeau is aiming for re-election after the release of a 2001 image of the Liberal Party leader in brownface makeup and in the wake of the SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. scandal; while Andrew Scheer’s Conservatives, Jagmeet Singh’s New Democrats, Elizabeth May’s Green Party, Maxime Bernier’s People’s Party of Canada and Yves-François Blanchet’s Bloc Quebecois jockey for power.  

Here’s a look at what each of the parties have promised so far on the major issues affecting the economy, business and your finances. BNN Bloomberg will keep this platform guide updated as more details are announced. 

Latest update: Sept. 20, 2019 

 

 

FISCAL PLAN 

Bloc Quebecois

  • No specific proposals to date

Conservatives

Greens

  • Balance the budget in five years (as stated by Elizabeth May in Sept. 12 debate)

Liberals 

  • Reduce deficits over the next five years to $9.8 billion by 2023-24 from $19.8 billion in 2019-20 (as per 2019 budget)  
  • Forecasts falling debt-to-GDP ratios: 30.7% in 2019-20; 30.5% in 2020-21; 30.0% in 2021-22; 29.3% in 2022-23; and 28.6% in 2023-24 (as per 2019 budget) 

NDP

  • Lower Canada's debt-to-GDP ratio over the next 10 years

People’s Party of Canada

  • Balance the budget within two years


 

HOUSING 

Bloc Quebecois

Conservatives

Greens

  • Legislate housing as a legally protected fundamental human right for all Canadians and permanent residents
  • Appoint a Minister of Housing to strengthen the National Housing Strategy so it meets the needs of affordable housing in each province
  • Eliminate the first-time home buyer incentive recently implemented by the Liberals
  • Restore tax incentives for building purpose-built rental housing and provide tax credits for gifts of lands to community land trusts to provide affordable housing
  • Refocus the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation’s mandate on supporting the development of affordable, non-market and cooperative housing, as opposed to one of its primary activities of providing mortgage loan insurance  

Liberals 

  • Introduce federal speculation tax on non-residents and a higher cap on the First-Time Home Buyer Incentive, which was implemented in early September.
  • Increased the amount first-time buyers can withdraw from their RRSPs to $35,000 from $25,000 in budget 2019.

NDP

  • Create 500,000 affordable housing units 
  • Re-introduce 30-year terms for insured mortgages for first-time homebuyers 
  • Double the first-time homebuyers’ tax credit to $1,5000 
  • Implement a 15 per cent foreign buyers' tax on purchases of residential property by foreign corporations or people who are not citizens or permanent residents 
  • Remove GST/HST on the construction of new rental units 
  • Work with provinces to create a public beneficial ownership registry to increase transparency about who owns properties in an effort to stop money laundering 

People’s Party of Canada

  • No specific pledges to date


 

SUPPLY MANAGEMENT 

Bloc Quebecois

Conservatives

Greens

Liberals

  • Support supply management, which became a sticking point in the new North American Free Trade Agreement talks. Canadian negotiators ultimately conceded, and under the new pact, which has yet to be ratified by all three countries’ lawmakers, Americans will be allowed to ship more milk to Canada’s protected dairy market. 
  • Trudeau has pledged $1.75 billion over eight years to compensate dairy farmers affected by free trade agreements with Europe and countries on the Pacific Rim. The Liberals have promised a similar program when the Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement comes into force. 

NDP

  • Vows to protect supply management

People’s Party of Canada

  • Phase out supply management over a number of years  
  • Allow Canada’s dairy, egg and poultry farmers to sell their products internationally


 

PERSONAL TAXES

Bloc Quebecois

Conservatives

Greens

  • Close tax loopholes that benefit the wealthy, such as ones on executive stock options and capital gains

Liberals

  • Cap employee stock option deductions for high-income earners in large and mature companies to $200,000 annually (as per 2019 budget

NDP 

  • Implement a "super-wealth tax" that applies a one-per-cent tax on fortunes above $20 million
  • Increase the amount of investment profits subject to capital gains taxation to 75 per cent, the rate that was in place in 2000, from 50 per cent 
  • For Canadians making over $210,000, will increase the top marginal tax rate by two points to 35 per cent, raising over half a billion dollars annually.  

People’s Party of Canada

  • Abolish the capital gains tax
  • Cut the federal tax to 15 per cent on income between $15,001 and $100,000, and 25 per cent tax rate on income above $100,000


 

CORPORATE TAXES

Bloc Quebecois

  • Require global technology giants to pay a three-per-cent tax on Canadian revenue, similar to that in France
  • Crack down on large corporations’ use of tax havens by reviewing the Canada Revenue Agency’s role and the country’s tax agreements with such jurisdictions

Conservatives

Greens

  • End offshore tax dodging by taxing funds hidden in offshore havens and requiring companies to prove that foreign affiliates are actual functioning businesses
  • Apply a corporate tax on transnational e-commerce firms doing business in Canada by requiring the foreign vendor to register, collect and remit taxes where the product or service is consumed
  • Eliminate all fossil fuel subsidies, including payments and tax write-offs, including the accelerated capital cost allowance on liquefied natural gas and tax write-offs for oil and gas wells
  • Increase the federal corporate tax rate from 15 to 21 per cent
  • Charge a five-per-cent surtax on commercial bank profits. Credit unions, caisses populaires and co-ops would be exempt.

Liberals

  • No specific proposals to date

NDP

  • Will roll corporate tax cuts back to 18 per cent (2010 levels) while maintaining the small business tax rate at its current level
  • Close stock option loopholes and crack down on shell companies operating in tax havens
  • Tax companies such as Netflix and Google on profits made in Canada and crack down on tax loopholes that favour web giants on advertising purchases

People’s Party of Canada

  • Lower corporate income tax rate to 10 per cent from 15 per cent
  • End corporate welfare
  • Expand the Accelerated Capital Cost Allowance program to all sectors


 

JOBS AND ECONOMY

Bloc Quebecois

  • Implement measures to protect Quebec jobs and corporations from foreign takeovers
  • Launch an investment fund aimed at promoting the province’s high-tech sectors such as gaming, green technology, aerospace and pharamceutical
  • Offer a remediation agreement with SNC-Lavalin 

Conservatives

  • Appoint a Quebec Minister of Canada Economic Development and a political minister from Quebec

Greens

  • Develop a Sustainable Generations Fund to invest in green trades and apprenticeship training, as well as education facilities 
  • Enhance the Youth Employment and Skills Strategy by creating a Community and Environment Service Corps. that will provide $1 billion annually to municipalities to hire Canadian youth
  • Study the impact of adopting a shorter work week
  • Ban unpaid internships in private sector workplaces
  • Raise the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour

Liberals

  •  No specific proposals to date

NDP

People’s Party of Canada

  • Limit the number of temporary foreign workers
  • Privatize Canada Post
  • Privatize airports

 


 

ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT

Bloc Quebecois

  • Promises to end fossil fuel subsidies
  • Committed to meeting the Paris Agreement targets on climate change, and has goals to exceed them
  • The party is against the proposed Energy East pipeline that would have run through Quebec, and wants to have a veto over any pipeline that would need to go through the province

Conservatives

  • Repeal Bill C-69, which overhauls the review process for resource projects in Canada
  • End Bill C-48, which bans oil tankers that are carrying more than 12 500 metric tons of crude oil along northern British Columbia  
  • Enact legislation to clarify roles of proponents and governments in consultations
  • End foreign-funded interference in regulatory hearings
  • Provide certainty on approval timelines and schedules
  • Eliminate the Trudeau government’s carbon tax

Greens

  • Reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 60 per cent by 2030 and to zero by 2050
  • Cancel the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion
  • Make electric vehicles affordable, expand charging stations and ban the purchase of new internal combustion engine vehicles by 2030
  • Mandate energy retrofits for all buildings by 2030
  • Regulate the CPP Investment Board to require divestment of coal, oil and gas shares 

Liberals

NDP

  • Introduce federal incentives for zero-emissions automobiles 
  • Electrify transit and other municipal fleets by 2030.
  • Power Canada with net carbon-free electricity by 2030 and move to 100% non-emitting electricity by 2050 by creating a Canadian Climate Bank to increase clean energy investments 
  • Ban single-use plastics.    
  • Continue carbon pricing, including rebates to households that fall under the federal backstop plan; roll back the breaks to big polluters

People's Party of Canada 

  • Find a private buyer for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project
  • Repeal Bill C-48 and Bill C-69
  • Scrap the federal carbon tax
  • Withdraw from the Paris Accord, an international agreement to fight climate change signed in 2016
  • Remove subsidies for green technology  
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TRADE

Bloc Quebecois

Conservatives

  • Work with provinces to implement an Interprovincial Free Trade Agreement (IFTA) 
  • Appoint a Minister of Interprovincial Trade, who would be responsible for leading negotiations and implementing the IFTA

Greens

  • Revamp national trade policy to align with national and international climate change plans
  • Renegotiate Canada’s trade and investment agreements to remove the Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) provisions that give foreign firms the ability to challenge government laws and policies

Liberals 

  • Aiming to ratify new NAFTA 

NDP

  • Modernize Canada’s trade remedy system and make sure that trade unions have full standing in trade cases and the ability to initiate disputes, as is the case in other countries.
  • Improve transparency during trade negotiations 
  • Will require use of Canadian steel and aluminum for infrastructure projects across the country 

People’s Party of Canada

 


 

CHILD CARE 

Bloc Quebecois  

  • No specific proposals to date

Conservatives

  • No specific proposals to date

Greens

  • Increase federal child care funding to at least one per cent of GDP annually, adding an additional $1 billion each year until the benchmark is reached
  • Eliminate all GST on all construction costs related to child-care spaces

Liberals

NDP

  • Invest $1 billion in affordable childcare in 2020 with plans to grow that investment annually 

People’s Party of Canada

  • No specific pledges to date

 

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RETIREMENT & SENIORS

Bloc Quebecois

  • Provide employers with a tax credit for training and retaining workers who are 65 and older
  • Create an income support benefit for older workers  

Conservatives

Greens

  • Over time, increase the Canada Pension Plan’s target income replacement rate from 25 per cent to 50 per cent of income received during working years
  • Protect private pensions by amending the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act and Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act to establish the pre-eminence of pensioners during company insolvency proceedings

Liberals 

NDP

People’s Party of Canada

  • No specific pledges to date

 


 

PHARMACARE AND HEALTHCARE 

Bloc Quebecois

Conservatives

  • Spend $1.5 billion to buy new medical imaging equipment for facilities across Canada
  • Maintain and increase the Canada Health Transfer, which provides long-term healthcare funding to the provinces and territories

Greens

Liberals 

  • The government introduced steps toward a national pharmacare program, including the creation of a new Canadian Drug Agency to coordinate purchases of prescription drugs and make high-cost drugs for rare diseases more affordable (as per 2019 budget

NDP

People’s Party of Canada

  • Replace the Canada Health Transfer cash payments with a permanent transfer of tax points of equivalent value to the provinces and territories, to give them a stable source of revenue
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IMMIGRATION

Bloc Quebecois

  • Introduce a bill to ensure that those who are applying for citizenship in Quebec have sufficient knowledge of French
  • Require the federal government to grant Quebec a veto on any federal decision to expel refugees
  • Suspend Canada’s Safe Third Country Agreement with the U.S.

Conservatives 

  • Renegotiate the Safe-Third Country Agreement with the United States and put an end to illegal border crossings at unofficial points of entry
  • Improve language training, credential recognition and make it easier for new Canadians who have existing skills that meet the country’s standards to apply their trades
  • Will prioritize people facing true persecution

Greens

  • Ensure professionals being considered for immigration have licensing requirements for their professions clearly explained before entry
  • Allocate greater funding for training in official languages for new immigrants
  • Eliminate the Temporary Foreign Workers Program and address labour shortages by increasing immigration, working with employers to establish paths to permanent residency
  • Terminate Canada’s Safe Third Country Agreement with the U.S.

Liberals

  • No specific proposals to date 

NDP

  • Work with the provinces to address gaps in settlement services and improve foreign credentials recognition.
  • End cap on applications to sponsor parents and grandparents; take on the backlogs that delay reunification 

People’s Party of Canada

TECHNOLOGY

Bloc Quebecois

Conservatives

  • Establish a cabinet committee on cyber security and data privacy
  • Create a “Canada Cyber Safe” brand to ensure consumers know when products have met certain security standards
  • Ensure companies collecting electronic data receive informed consent from Canadians

Greens

  • Mandate more affordable cell phone and internet plans
  • Implement corporate tax on e-commerce companies like Netflix
  • Enact provisions to protect consumers and investors from fraud and theft in cryptocurrencies
  • Strengthen digital privacy laws with measures such as prohibiting warrantless intrusions on Canadians’ communications, banning cyber surveillance programs that use bulk data collection, requiring companies to respect the “right to be forgotten,” and making data breach reporting mandatory for government departments, companies, banks and political parties

Liberals

  • No specific proposals yet

NDP

  • Work with international allies to deal with threats to national security, including cyber crime
  • Enforce a price cap to make sure that Canadians aren’t paying more than the global average for their cell phone and internet bills
  • Expand internet coverage to remote communities

People’s Party of Canada

 

EDUCATION  

Bloc Quebecois

Conservatives

Greens

Liberals

  • No specific proposals to date

NDP

  • Cancel interest on all existing and future student loans

 

 

SMALL BUSINESS 

Bloc Quebecois

Conservatives

  • No specific proposals to date 

Greens 

  • Maintain the current level of taxation for small business

Liberals 

  • End “swipe fees” for GST and HST that merchants must pay to credit card firms every time one is used  
  • Create the Canada Entrepreneur Account, which would provide up to 2,000 entrepreneurs every year with as much as $50,000 to launch a new business

NDP

  • Tackle high credit card merchant fees
  • Add new legislation to end the unfair tax treatment of family transfers of small businesses 

People’s Party of Canada

  • No specific pledges to date

 

CANNABIS

 

Bloc Quebecois

  • No specific proposals to date

Conservatives

  • No specific proposals to date

Greens

Liberals

  • Under new regulations, cannabis edibles, extracts and topical products will become legal by Oct. 17. However, the products are not expected to hit legal retail stores until mid-December.

NDP

  • No specific proposals to date

People’s Party of Canada

  • No specific proposals to date